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21
Cosmetic Procedures & Surgeries / Re: Sagging after v-line?
« Last post by wendyrikako on Yesterday at 01:15:50 pm »
Hi! I want to proceed v-line but recently found out about skin sagging issue after the operation. Are there any ways to avoid skin sagging after cutting your bone or I’ll have to lift my skin with threads or Botox injections anyway?

I did v line reduction surgery in Korea 2 years ago. A few months after the surgery, I noticed my jawline sagging and a double chin forming. I saw Dr Daniel Chang, who explained this could potentially be a result of the jaw reduction surgery, because the soft tissue in my face now has less bony support.

With a touch of fillers to my chin and temples together with face threadlift, that really helped my sagginess.  :)
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https://www.msn.com/en-sg/lifestyle/smart-living/why-an-instagram-influencer-is-being-mocked-for-her-ridiculous-business-class-photo/ar-AAApEvx


Ermmmm .... i don't see anything wrong wor .... unless her fairy lights can short-circuit and bring down the plane? ???
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its all about diet. Just eat healthy and small meals like the japanese
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https://m.scmp.com/week-asia/society/article/2165179/how-singapores-formula-one-fling-sugar-daddies-turned-sour

Singapore hosted an array of concerts, after-parties and events for race aficionados and revellers alike during the Formula One weekend last week. But one controversial gathering almost stole the show from the annual sporting event.

A sugar daddy convention, dubbed “The Fast Lane” and supported by Malaysian “sugar dating” app Sugarbook, was held during the five-day F1-themed Sky Grande Prix promotional event run by the Singapore Tourism Board at the Grand Hyatt hotel.

The party brought together sugar baby and sugar daddy wannabes from the city state and from as far afield as the Philippines, Malaysia, Hong Kong and even New York.

But the bash inevitably irked officials in Singapore, where the Sugarbook app remains contentious. Sugar dating is a type of relationship in which older, wealthy men or women – the sugar daddy or mummy – spend an extravagant amount on a lover, girlfriend or boyfriend, known as the sugar baby, in exchange for companionship that typically includes sex.

The tourism board, trying to distance itself from the controversial website, stopped marketing the party after having initially included it in its F1 promotion campaign, not knowing Sugarbook was a sponsor of Sky Grande Prix.

This is not the first time one of the company’s events has faced resistance. A similar event in Kuala Lumpur in April had to switch venues after one of the city’s posh entertainment outlets, which first agreed to host it, called it off.

“At first, [the tourism board] were OK with sponsoring the whole event, then the media frenzy happened and they wanted to pull out,” said Darren Chan, the app founder and chief executive. “I totally understand because [the tourism board] have to do what’s best for the country. If I [were the tourism board] and if I thought the brand was controversial, I would have [made] the same decision. But we are here to have a good time, no hanky-panky, nothing to worry about.”

The lavish party went on despite the setback. Dozens of well-dressed people packed the venue – a sort of lounge, bar and nightclub – as a DJ played popular dance music all night. At the back of the lounge, there was a blackjack table, with a “fund me daddy” sign, where guests tried their luck with fake S$100 (US$73) notes. Bartenders were kept on their toes at all hours, serving alcohol to partygoers who were crowding the bar.

Men were on the lookout for potential sugar babies, as were women for sugar daddies, although they might have had a hard time chatting over the loud music.

News of the tourism board pulling out of the party indirectly promoted the event, at least in Simon’s case. The 33-year-old Asian-American from New York was in Singapore on a business trip and decided to join the party in the small hours, when most guests had already left.


HOW SINGAPORE’S FORMULA ONE FLING WITH SUGAR DADDIES TURNED SOUR
BY RESTY WORO YUNIAR
22 SEP 2018
While fans focused on the race last week, others were revelling in a world where there’s a fine line between romance and remittance … and tourism officials weren’t happy about it

 5
Darren Chan, the Sugarbook founder, and his girlfriend Charmaine at The Fast Lane party. Chan was inspired to create Sugarbook as his friends often teased Charmaine, who is 10 years younger than him. Photo: Resty Woro Yuniar
Darren Chan, the Sugarbook founder, and his girlfriend Charmaine at The Fast Lane party. Chan was inspired to create Sugarbook as his friends often teased Charmaine, who is 10…
Singapore hosted an array of concerts, after-parties and events for race aficionados and revellers alike during the Formula One weekend last week. But one controversial gathering almost stole the show from the annual sporting event.

A sugar daddy convention, dubbed “The Fast Lane” and supported by Malaysian “sugar dating” app Sugarbook, was held during the five-day F1-themed Sky Grande Prix promotional event run by the Singapore Tourism Board at the Grand Hyatt hotel.

The party brought together sugar baby and sugar daddy wannabes from the city state and from as far afield as the Philippines, Malaysia, Hong Kong and even New York.


But the bash inevitably irked officials in Singapore, where the Sugarbook app remains contentious. Sugar dating is a type of relationship in which older, wealthy men or women – the sugar daddy or mummy – spend an extravagant amount on a lover, girlfriend or boyfriend, known as the sugar baby, in exchange for companionship that typically includes sex.

Why Facebook bet US$1 billion on a Singapore data centre
The tourism board, trying to distance itself from the controversial website, stopped marketing the party after having initially included it in its F1 promotion campaign, not knowing Sugarbook was a sponsor of Sky Grande Prix.

This is not the first time one of the company’s events has faced resistance. A similar event in Kuala Lumpur in April had to switch venues after one of the city’s posh entertainment outlets, which first agreed to host it, called it off.

Bar attendants light sparklers during The Fast Lane, a F1-related party held last weekend that is sponsored by Malaysian sugar dating website Sugarbook, among others. Photo: Resty Woro Yuniar
Bar attendants light sparklers during The Fast Lane, a F1-related party held last weekend that is sponsored by Malaysian sugar dating website Sugarbook, among others. Photo: Resty Woro Yuniar

 
THIS WEEK IN ASIA
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“At first, [the tourism board] were OK with sponsoring the whole event, then the media frenzy happened and they wanted to pull out,” said Darren Chan, the app founder and chief executive. “I totally understand because [the tourism board] have to do what’s best for the country. If I [were the tourism board] and if I thought the brand was controversial, I would have [made] the same decision. But we are here to have a good time, no hanky-panky, nothing to worry about.”

A DJ at The Fast Lane party in Singapore. Photo: Resty Woro Yuniar
A DJ at The Fast Lane party in Singapore. Photo: Resty Woro Yuniar

ALL NIGHT LONG


The lavish party went on despite the setback. Dozens of well-dressed people packed the venue – a sort of lounge, bar and nightclub – as a DJ played popular dance music all night. At the back of the lounge, there was a blackjack table, with a “fund me daddy” sign, where guests tried their luck with fake S$100 (US$73) notes. Bartenders were kept on their toes at all hours, serving alcohol to partygoers who were crowding the bar.

Men were on the lookout for potential sugar babies, as were women for sugar daddies, although they might have had a hard time chatting over the loud music.

The tourism board in Singapore dropped the “sugar daddy” party from its promotion campaign. Photo: Reuters
The tourism board in Singapore dropped the “sugar daddy” party from its promotion campaign. Photo: Reuters

News of the tourism board pulling out of the party indirectly promoted the event, at least in Simon’s case. The 33-year-old Asian-American from New York was in Singapore on a business trip and decided to join the party in the small hours, when most guests had already left.

Singapore's OBike gets on its bike: 'Proof you can kill your innovators'
“I know the party from the news that the tourism board took the event out [from the F1 weekend’s parties list],” Simon, a fast-talking investor with a focus on tech companies, told This Week in Asia. “I’m based in New York but I’m here [in Singapore] once a month, so I was hoping to find sugar babies from outside the US, like Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, or the Philippines.”

Had Simon come earlier, he might have been able to fulfil that wish. Mika, an aspiring sugar baby who left around midnight, came all the way from Manila after her friends at home told her about the party. Mika, who came with a girlfriend, said she was a little overwhelmed as she was new to the game.

“It’s my first time coming to parties like this … I don’t really like it because I don’t make a lot of friends,” said Mika, a brace-wearing, plump woman in her early 20s. “And I don’t think [the men] here like girls like me, they want sexy girls.”

While Mika may be a beginner, she was far from clueless about sugar dating. One of her friends in Manila, also in her 20s, is a sugar baby to a 74-year-old married man, and she is pregnant. “Her daddy helps her financially, like paying for her rent”, said Mika, adding that she, too, would like to be pampered by an older man.

Sugar daddies do offer that perk. Simon, who has had a couple of sugar babies he met through a sugar-dating platform called SeekingArrangement, said he gave his former sugar babies a “few hundred dollars” each time they met, a set-up known as pay-per-meet. He had also bought expensive items for them such as handbags or boots.

“I wouldn’t mind paying for a monthly allowance or vacation [for my sugar babies], but it depends on how they are performing in everything, [either] in bed or in the relationship,” Simon said.

Married men with time and money to spend could also be found at the party. John, a 34-year-old dapper-looking executive, is an aspiring sugar daddy despite having been married for a year to his “hot and pretty” wife. The Malaysian national, who works in Singapore, said that he is a member of both Sugarbook and SeekingArrangement, and is able to access the apps every now and then as he travels a lot for work.



Critics say sugar dating is akin to prostitution and the lopsided power dynamics in the relationship could lead to psychological and health problems for sugar babies. These include low self-esteem and suicidal tendencies when relationships turn sour, and the inability to see future relationships as anything more than transactional. In some cases, vulnerable young women are also at risk of sexual assaults.
26
Bags, Footwear & Accessories / Re: Beware of dishonest seller
« Last post by happyshar on Yesterday at 12:27:17 pm »
Lol I still support several genuine local crafters.
It's easy to tell whether it's MIC all u hv to do is do a screenshot and search image.
27
Cosmetics & Make-up / Re: Amazing Make-Up Transformation - REALLY ???!!!!
« Last post by beaverjuice on Yesterday at 12:19:41 pm »

Consters!  >:( .... gals are out to 骗财骗色 too!   :o

@happyshar
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just to provide an update to anyone who has signed
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https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/malaysia-cannot-accept-same-sex-marriage--says-mahathir-10744796

while I disagree with most if not all of the actions and words of Tun. Dr. Mahathir .... and I think he's a recalcitrant pr!ck ..... this I cannot agree more ......

how I wish our PM and government can be morally strong like him .....

speaking of which ..... have you signed the petition yet?

https://www.change.org/p/singapore-government-please-keep-penal-code-377a-in-singapore

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